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Vexillopedia

Flag of Estonia

Estonia
Ratio 7:11
Adoption 1918
Design A horizontal triband of blue, black and white. [0]
Colors
#0072CE
#000000
#FFFFFF

History

The story of the flag begins 17 September 1881, when the constituent Assembly of the first Estonian national student Corps "Vironia" in the city of Tartu was also identified in color, later became national.

The flag became associated with Estonian nationalism and was used as the national flag (riigilipp) when the Estonian Declaration of Independence was issued on February 24, 1918. The flag was formally adopted on November 21, 1918. December 12, 1918, was the first time the flag was raised as the national symbol atop of the Pikk Hermann Tower in Tallinn.

The invasion by the Soviet Union in June 1940 led to the flag's ban. It was taken down from the most symbolic location, the tower of Pikk Hermann in Tallinn, on June 21, 1940, when Estonia was still formally independent. On the next day, 22 June, it was hoisted along with the red flag. The tricolour disappeared completely from the tower on July 27, 1940, and was replaced by the flag of the Estonian SSR.

During the German occupation from 1941 until 1944, the flag was accepted as the ethnic flag of Estonians but not the national flag. After the German retreat from Tallinn in September 1944, the Estonian flag was hoisted once again.

When the Red Army arrived on 22 September, the red flag was just added at first. Soon afterwards, however, the blue-black-white flag disappeared. The flag remained illegal until the days of perestroika in the late 1980s. 21 October 1987 was the first time when Soviet forces didn't dare to take the flag that had been put up in a public event. 24 February 1989 the blue-black-white flag was again flown from the Pikk Hermann tower in Tallinn. It was formally re-declared as the national flag on 7 August 1990, little over a year before Estonia regained full independence. [0]

Meaning

There are a number of interpretations attributed to the colours of the flag. A historical interpretation of the colours has blue representing ancient freedom, truth, sky and sea, black symbolizing soil, lost independence and dark coats, and white, the promise and pursuit of a brighter future.

Another interpretation made popular by the poetry of Martin Lipp is as follows: blue represents the vaulted blue sky above the native land, black represents the attachment to the soil of the homeland as well as the fate of Estonians – for centuries black with worries, and white represents purity, hard work, and commitment [0]