Random FlagContribute

Vexillopedia

Flag of Singapore

Singapore
Ratio 2:3
Adoption 1959
Design A horizontal bicolour of red and white; charged in white in the canton with a crescent facing the fly and a pentagon of five stars. [0]
Colors
#ED2939
#FFFFFF

History

The design of the flag was completed in two months by a committee headed by Toh. He initially wanted the flag's entire background to be red, but the Cabinet decided against this, as red was regarded as a rallying point for communism. According to an account given by Lee Kuan Yew, the Chinese population wanted five stars, which were modeled off the flag of the People's Republic of China and the Muslim population wanted a crescent moon. Both of these symbols were combined to create the national flag of Singapore.

On 30 November 1959, the Singapore State Arms and Flag and National Anthem Ordinance 1959 was passed to regulate the use and display of the State Arms and State Flag and the performance of the National Anthem. When presenting the motion to the Legislative Assembly of Singapore on 11 November 1959, Sinnathamby Rajaratnam, the Minister for Culture, stated: "National flags, crest and anthem express symbolically the hopes and ideals of a people... The possession of a national flag and crest is, for a people, symbolic of self-respect.".

In September 1962, the people of Singapore voted to join the Federation of Malaysia. The process was completed on 16 September 1963, when the Malaysian flag was hoisted on Singapore by Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew. The Singapore flag was reconfirmed as the national flag when Singapore became fully independent from Malaysia on 9 August 1965. [0]

Meaning

The Singapore Arms and Flag and National Anthem Rules define the flag's composition and the symbolism of its elements: red symbolizes "universal brotherhood and equality of man", and white, "pervading and everlasting purity and virtue". The waxing crescent moon "represents a young nation on the ascendant". The five stars "stand for the nation's ideals of democracy, peace, progress, justice and equality".

During the second half of the 20th century, the star and crescent symbol came to be recognized as a symbol of Islamism, and Singapore's flag came to be seen in this context by the nation's Muslim activists. It remains the only non-muslim nation to have a crescent moon in its national flag. [0]